Mission in Korea

The first Columban missionaries entered Korea in 1933, overcoming much adversity. By the late 1950s there were a quarter million Catholics. Today, 10 percent of the population — more than 5 million people — are Catholic. There is no shortage of vocations.

The original Columban mission goal of setting up a self-reliant local Church has been replaced by a vision to help promote a better life for the poor and those deprived of their basic human rights. Traditional parish work has given way to new ministries reaching out to the urban poor, workers, farmers, alcoholics, gamblers and the disabled. 

Korean Missionary Education Program

Korean Newsletter

The Korean Newsletter gives the latest Columban mission news, interviews and information. Your can read book reviews, Gwangju news, formation reflections, Mission news and more. Read the latest issue. (English) 

Columban Lay Missionaries from Korea

Lay Missionaries

The Columban Lay Missionaries is an intercultural group of women and men called to respond to God's mission by crossing boundaries of race, culture and creed. (Korean)

2017 Korean Seminarians

Be a Columban Priest

 Currently eight Korean priests are serving in Chile, Peru and other countries. Perhaps you would like to find out more about the life of a Columban missionary priest and whether God is calling you to such a life. Learn more. (Korean)

Korea Mission Center News

Korean Mission

Columban Fr. Brian Geraghty and parishioners in Korea

Columbans Enter Korea in 1933

Nine newly-ordained Columban Fathers arrived in China in autumn of 1933, and learned they would be sent to Korea to establish a new Columban mission there. Led by Columban Father Owen MacPolin, one of the original Columbans who went to China in 1920, they set up their new mission in the town of Mokpo, In the coming decades, the Columbans persevered through hardship, to found parishes, create countless charitable and economic projects, and expand to other locations in Korea.

Columban Mission

100

Years of mission to the world

17

Countries

4

Generations of people lifted to dignity